Face Shapes and Necklines

by Janice

I plan to revisit my Sencha blouse again soon, which had me thinking about necklines and face shapes. I still wear my keyhole neckline Sencha, but I’ve never felt comfortable with the high neckline. I’ll probably draft the neckline differently once I tackle this project again for a more wearable Sencha based on the guidelines below.

+ + +

What face shape am I?

The best way to determine your face shape is to stand in front of a mirror. Pull your hair back and draw a faint line on the mirror, following the outline of your face.

Here are some examples of different face shapes:

women_face_shape

+ + +

The most balanced face shape is the oval face shape. The combination of the face shape and the neckline aim to create balance, giving the illusion of a more oval-shaped face. Here are some examples of face shapes and necklines.

+ + +

round-face

The Round Face

The round face needs vertical space to balance out the roundness. Necklines that are flattering include v-necks, shirt/blouse collars, Queen Anne necklines and Empire necklines.

+ + +

long-face

The Long Face

The long face needs horizontal space to balance out the longness, making the face appear wider and more oval. Necklines that are flattering include using necklines that are shallower, and which do not generate such a downward focus. Neck styles as the Sabrina, Bateau, Portrait and Cowl Neck, are also flattering.

+ + +

angular-face

The Angular Face

The angular face needs curves to balance out the angles. These can come in a variety of neckline styles, such as the Scoop Neck, Sabrina, Sweetheart and Cowl Neck styles. The triangle, inverted triangle and diamond shape face all fall under the Angular Face category, as do those individuals with a Square Face.

+ + +

neckline

The Oval Face

The oval face can wear generally any look, as it’s already balanced.

Source: greatestlook.com

+ + +

Here are other examples of necklines and face shapes:

FaceNeckline

casuallarge

revealinglarge

conservativelarge